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Palestine mountain gazelle now endangered, say scientists

Guardian Environment News - 2 hours 19 sec ago

Zoologists report that just 2,000 identified individuals of the species remain after a dramatic decline in the past 15 years

Zoologists are recommending that one of the Middle East’s most iconic mammals – the Palestine mountain gazelle – be placed on the endangered list amid a dramatic decline in its numbers in the last decade and a half.

Numbers of the gazelles, whose habitat is in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories – including a population that lives in the hills on the outskirts of Jerusalem – have dropped to about 2,000 identified individuals.

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Categories: Environment

trash day

The Field Lab - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 4:50pm
Last load of 9 months of trash and recyclables removed.  88,95,68,0,C
Categories: Sustainable SW Blogs

Solar industry criticises Queensland government for delay in tackling prices

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 4:19pm

‘Sunshine state’ sees major slump in rooftop solar uptake as industry accuses government of warding off prospective customers by prolonging price uncertainty

The body for the Australian solar industry has criticised the Queensland government for an “unacceptable” delay in tackling prices for solar energy amid a dramatic slump in new rooftop solar customers.

The Palaszczuk government, which aims to lift the number of homes with solar panels in the “sunshine state” to 1m by 2020, has tasked the state productivity commission with reviewing prices that were cut dramatically by the previous Liberal National government.

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Categories: Environment

Warning over Pacific bluefin tuna stocks as Japan meeting ends in stalemate

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 3:18pm

Meeting ends with no move to save endangered fish as campaigners warn bluefin tuna stocks will continue to plunge unless urgent action is taken

Campaigners have warned that global stocks of bluefin tuna will continue their dramatic decline after Japan– by far the fish’s biggest consumer – and other countries failed to agree on new conservation measures.

A four-day meeting in Sapporo, northern Japan, of countries that monitor stocks in most of the Pacific Ocean, made no progress towards helping fish populations recover from decades of overfishing, according to the Pew Charitable Trusts.

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Categories: Environment

The insects of doom

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 1:30pm

During a brief respite from the bank holiday rains, the garden of the small cottage where I was staying on the north Norfolk coast was suddenly filled with pristine red admirals.

This big, handsome red, black and white insect really is the quintessential September butterfly.

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Categories: Environment

Native American Goes Back To His Roots To Solve Garbage Problem On Reservations

NPR News - Environment - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 1:25pm

The Navajo and Hopi tribes produce about 300 million pounds of waste a year. And there are few places to dump it, let alone recycle. The tribes do not have landfills — only overflowing waste transfer stations — so there are hundreds of illegal dump sites. One Hopi man is trying to change that.

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Categories: Environment

California Considers Sweeping Proposals To Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions

NPR News - Environment - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 1:25pm

The state is often a step ahead of the status quo when it comes to environmental policy, and climate change is no exception. New legislation includes a plan to cut gasoline use in vehicles by half.

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Categories: Environment

'Shy' king cobra on the loose leads Orlando school to lock children inside

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 11:56am

Reptile experts urged local residents not to panic but deadly snake – who escaped from owner’s cage – has the venom to kill 20 humans

Children at a Florida school were locked indoors on Thursday as wildlife officials scoured the grounds for a venomous 8ft-long king cobra that broke free from a cage and slithered away from its owner’s home.

Staff at Clarcona elementary school in Orlando moved physical education classes and recess inside until the deadly snake, which authorities say has enough venom to kill 20 humans, was recaptured.

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Categories: Environment

George Osborne accused of 'disastrous' assault on green agenda

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 11:13am

Former minister Ed Davey says chancellor is pursuing ideologically driven campaign against renewable energy

Ed Davey, the former energy and climate change secretary, has accused George Osborne of putting tens of billions of pounds’ worth of private sector investment at risk with an assault on the green agenda he pioneered.

The Liberal Democrat said the chancellor was pursuing “bonkers economics” and an ill-advised and ideologically driven campaign against renewable energy that risked leaving the UK hopelessly dependent in the longer term on fossil fuels such as gas.

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Categories: Environment

Coast Guard: Tow Boat Collision On Mississippi Causes Oil Spill

NPR News - Environment - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 10:26am

River traffic was halted on a portion of the waterway after the accident near Paducah, Ky. The maximum size of the Wednesday evening spill of clarified slurry oil is thought to be 250,000 gallons.

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Categories: Environment

Alaska's warming climate is world’s wake-up call, Obama says – video

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 9:11am

Barack Obama warns that Alaska’s warming climate is a wake-up call to America and the rest of the world. Speaking at a school in Kotzebue, a small town north of the Arctic Circle, Obama said the US would not sit idly by if its livelihood were threatened by a hostile nation, and argued that a warming climate requires the same level of action

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Categories: Environment

Mysterious stranded whales get medical aid from Mississippi experts

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 9:08am

Two seriously ill young melon-headed whales – a species not seen in the area for 40 years – are being tended at the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies

Marine experts in Mississippi are working around the clock as a mysterious pair of whales, their species unseen in south Mississippi for 40 years, fight for survival.

Moby Solangi, director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, said a fisherman on Tuesday reported what he thought were two dead dolphins on the beach in Waveland.

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Categories: Environment

Farms versus birds: winners & losers - in pictures | @GrrlScientist

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 9:01am

Portraits of some tropical bird species in Colombia’s Chocó-Andes region that will be agriculture’s winners and losers when their cloudforest neighbourhood is converted into cattle pasture

Read more here.

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Categories: Environment

Homeowner solar power subsidy cuts 'threaten 20,000 jobs'

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 8:58am

Friends of the Earth says cuts to feed-in tariff payments for people with solar panels could stop more than 1GW of solar power being installed each year

Government plans to slash subsidies for solar panels on homes could cost more than 20,000 jobs, green campaigners have claimed.

Ministers have announced proposals to cut the amount paid for domestic solar arrays from 12.47p per kilowatt hour to 1.63p for new systems from January 2016 - a fall of 87%.

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Categories: Environment

'ExxonMobil has its head in the sand and shareholders should be worried'

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 7:49am

Yale sustainability expert Todd Cort says the oil company’s failure to adapt to changing growth models has landed it between a rock and a hard place

A few days before the New York Times reported that a federal auction in the Gulf of Mexico in August drew the lowest interest since 1986 – “the clearest sign yet that the fortunes of oil companies are skidding” – I found myself reading the 2014 ExxonMobil Citizenship Report.

The report cites an energy future that’s heavily dependent on oil and gas during the difficult transition to more sustainable energy sources. ExxonMobil then drafts a socially imperative role for itself:

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Categories: Environment

Refugee horrors cry out for humanity and leadership | Letters

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 5:55am

It is not easy to look in the mirror and value your reflection if you are not absolutely horrified by the images of a dead, innocent Syrian boy face down on a beach (The shocking cruel reality of Europe’s refugee crisis, 3 September). That boy was someone’s son, someone’s grandson – he was one of us. To state that we should all be ashamed to bear witness is an understatement. To state that we have every right to expect our leaders to stand up and lead, to show leadership, statesmanship even, is almost trite now. The image crystallises the time we live in. Rather a dead child than the humanity and leadership required to afford people, just like us, a home. Today, I am ashamed to be British.
Thomas Bennett
Birmingham

• You quote the prime minister (Cameron: we can’t take any more people fleeing from war, 3 September) as claiming: “We have taken ‘a number’ of genuine asylum seekers” (or displaced people as a less judgmental world once termed them), yet when comparing our government’s response to the Syrian crisis to that of Germany’s, a stark contrast is revealed. The “number” referred to is 216 over the past year, compared to between 800,000 and 1 million for Germany. Britain’s quota would fill just three doubledecker buses whereas Germany’s would fill Wembley stadium 10 times over.
Austen Lynch
Garstang, Lancashire

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Categories: Environment

New economic thinking could help tackle the planetary and housing crises | Andrew Simms

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 4:59am

Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘people’s quantitative easing’ for house building was derided by many, but to keep a roof over all our heads in the face of climate change it is time for fresh economic thinking

If your house was slowly falling down, in serious danger of catching fire or getting repossessed you’d know something was wrong and needed changing. Yet, tens of millions of homes are at risk globally according to Nasa’s latest research on sea level change, because of ice loss from Greenland and the Antarctic, melting glaciers and the thermal expansion of the warming oceans.

Oikos, meaning household, and nomos, meaning roughly a set of rules, are the generally accepted Greek roots for the word economics. Hence, stripped of its own wilful obfuscations as a discipline, economics is the art of good housekeeping. But, as the Nasa research shows, economics is failing lamentably at the level of planetary housekeeping, just as it is in the UK at the more prosaic but also important level of the housing market.

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Categories: Environment

Fossil fuel bosses' soaring pay may spell trouble for the climate – and their firms

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 4:00am

It may be time for oil and gas firms to take a hard look at their compensation practices, whether to save the environment or themselves

Anyone who watched the shenanigans on Wall Street in the years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis couldn’t have been left with much doubt: poorly designed compensation policies that encouraged greed and discouraged fear were partly responsible for the near-collapse of the entire financial system.

Can similar compensation policies in the oil and gas sector be held responsible for climate change? It’s a provocative question, especially as Barack Obama wraps up his three-day trip to Alaska.

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Categories: Environment

Japanese town's annual dolphin hunt starts

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 3:48am

Controversial six-month hunting season begins in Taiji with a minke whale hunt due to start at the weekend

A small Japanese town kicked off its controversial dolphin hunt on Thursday after bad weather delayed the start, according to a local fisheries official, while a separate whaling hunt was due to start at the weekend.

But the dolphin-hunt boats returned to Taiji’s port – thrust into the global spotlight in the Oscar-winning 2009 documentary The Cove – having failed to trap any of the mammals.

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Categories: Environment

EU diplomats reveal devastating impact of Ethiopia dam project on remote tribes

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/09/03 - 3:46am

Lives of semi-nomadic tribespeople being irreversibly changed by relocation into poorly planned settlements to make way for sugar plantation, says released report

A controversial World Bank-funded scheme to dam a major Ethiopian river and import up to 500,000 people to work in what is planned to be one of the world’s largest sugar plantations has led to tens of thousands of Africa’s most remote and vulnerable people being insensitively resettled.

According to reports, released this week, by two teams of British, American and EU diplomats who visited the resettlement areas in the Lower Omo Valley in southern Ethiopia last year, the lives of 20,000 Mursi, Bodi and other semi-nomadic tribespeople are being “fundamentally and irreversibly” changed by the mega-project.

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Categories: Environment
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