Feed aggregator

The latest weak attacks on EVs and solar panels | Dana Nuccitelli

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2018/06/04 - 3:00am

The powerful few who benefit from the fossil fuel status quo are exerting their influence

Over the past two weeks, media attacks on solar panels and electric vehicles have been followed by Trump administration policies aimed at boosting their fossil fueled rivals.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

'No doubt our climate is getting warmer,' Malcolm Turnbull says

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2018/06/04 - 1:07am

Despite the PM’s declaration, it is unclear how current climate policy will ensure Australia reaches its Paris commitment

Malcolm Turnbull, on a tour of drought-stricken areas in New South Wales and Queensland, has declared there is “no doubt that our climate is getting warmer”.

Flanked by Nationals on Monday in Trangie, Turnbull acknowledged climate change remained a live political debate but he said: “I don’t know many people in rural New South Wales that I talk to that don’t think the climate is getting drier and rainfall is becoming more volatile.”

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

A Small Puerto Rico Town's Makeshift Relief Center

NPR News - Environment - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 2:32pm

After Hurricane Maria, Christine Nieves started the Proyecto de Apoyo Mutuo Mariana to feed a community that was devastated by the storm. They still offer one meal a day.

Categories: Environment

How Is FEMA Preparing For Hurricane Season In Puerto Rico?

NPR News - Environment - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 2:32pm

June 1 marked the beginning of the 2018 hurricane season. What lessons were learned from Hurricanes Irma and Maria?

Categories: Environment

How shall they be judged?

The Field Lab - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 1:11pm
So the lost donkey story had a happy ending today.  He just got picked up and transported to his new home.   A group of folks are starting a rescue operation for local livestock that gets cast aside or left to die (which happens a lot out here).  Proverbs 12:10 A righteous man regardeth the life of his beast: but the tender mercies of the wicked are cruel.  
Categories: Sustainable SW Blogs

Don't turn to the military to solve the climate-change crisis| Nick Buxton

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 11:00am

Warning about conflicts, wars and mass migration is the wrong way to approach things

The Australian Senate’s declaration last month that climate change is a “current and existential national security risk” was clearly intended to inject much-needed urgency into the country’s climate policy stalemate. Bringing together the unusual bedfellows of military generals and environmentalists to warn about the dangers of climate change, it has the possibility to break though Australia’s culture wars on the issue. However, by framing climate change as a security matter, it also has significant consequences in shaping how we respond to a warming planet. As the climate crisis unfolds, is the military the institution we want to turn to for solutions?

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Newcastle fells more trees than any other UK council

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 10:33am

City has cleared 8,414 trees in last three years – twice as many as any other authority

Newcastle has become the tree-felling capital of the UK after the council chopped down almost twice as many trees as any other local authority.

More than 110,000 trees have been cut down by councils across the UK in the last three years, according to figures gathered under the Freedom of Information (FOI) act by the Sunday Times. Some 8,414 were in Newcastle, more than in any other rural or urban local authority. Wiltshire was next, having felled 4,778 in the same period, followed by Edinburgh with 4,435.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Farming and humanity versus the environment | Letters

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 10:01am
Guy Smith says it’s unfair to point the finger at farming as the cause of environmental damage, Iain Climie addresses food wastage and Dr Blake Alcott says the most effective way to reduce your carbon footprint is to not reproduce

One fundamental point has been overlooked by Kevin Rushby in his article about the plight of the countryside due to agriculture (The killing fields, G2, 31 May). There has been no intensification of agriculture in the UK for 25 years.

Government statistics show pesticide and fertiliser use has been significantly reduced. There are fewer crops grown and the numbers of pigs, sheep and cattle have fallen. So to point the finger at farming as the cause of environmental degradation through intensification makes no sense, especially when you consider the other changes that have taken place in that time – increased housebuilding, more roads, and more cars on those roads – and the impact they have had on the country’s landscape.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Greece tourism at record high amid alarm over environmental cost

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 7:56am

With 32 million visitors expected this year, fears grow that the country cannot cope

Greece is braced for another bumper year. The tourists will not stop coming. For every one of its citizens, three foreign visitors – 32 million in total – will arrive this year, more than at any other time since records began.

It’s an extraordinary feat for a country that has battled with bankruptcy, at times has been better known for its protests and riots and, only three years ago, narrowly escaped euro ejection. Tourism is the heavy industry that has helped keep catastrophe at bay.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Industry looks to graduate fashion week for sustainable heroes

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2018/06/03 - 5:03am

Sustainability is intrinsic and not an afterthought for many designers taking part in this year’s event

The future of fashion is sustainable if graduate fashion week is anything to go by. The annual four-day event event at London’s Old Truman Brewery comprises installations, catwalk shows and two prize-giving ceremonies and promises to uncover the torchbearers of “considered design”, according to the event’s creative and managing director, Martyn Roberts.

Roberts believes that graduates can help existing fashion houses and retailers tap into “what a new generation of consumers want”. As brands from every echelon seek to improve their social, economic and environmental impact, graduate fashion week, says Roberts, is where many companies are looking for creatives for whom sustainability is intrinsic, as opposed to an afterthought, to show them how it’s done.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

What was the fallout from Fukushima?

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 11:00pm
When a tsunami hit the nuclear plant, thousands fled. Many never returned – but has the radiation risk been exaggerated?

Shunichi Yamashita knows a lot of about the health effects of radiation. But he is a pariah in his home country of Japan, because he insists on telling those evacuated after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident that the hazards are much less than they suppose. Could he be right?

Yamashita was born in Nagasaki in 1952, seven years after the world’s second atomic weapon obliterated much of the city. “My mother was 16 years old when the bomb dropped and she was two miles away,” he told me at his office in the city, where he still lives with his mother, who is now 88.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Eerie silence falls on Shetland cliffs that once echoed to seabirds’ cries

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 10:59pm
Climate change has caused a catastrophic drop in the numbers of terns, kittiwakes and puffins

Sumburgh Head lies at the southern tip of mainland Shetland. This dramatic 100-metre-high rocky spur, crowned with a lighthouse built by Robert Louis Stevenson’s grandfather, has a reputation for being one of the biggest and most accessible seabird colonies in Britain.

Thousands of puffins, guillemots, razorbills, kittiwakes and fulmars gather there every spring to breed, covering almost every square inch of rock or grass with teeming, screeching birds and their young.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Rewilding success stories

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 10:59pm
Reintroduction programmes of animals driven from their once-natural habits are a cause for optimism

In May, Dutch and Romanian European bison reintroduction programmes were declared successful after several years of conservation efforts. The Dutch project began back in 2007; the wild cattle had been extinct in that region for two centuries. Now, though, both national parks in question are reaping great environmental benefits from the bisons’ grazing, with a consequent flourishing of flora and fauna.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

When the sweet turns sour: Queensland split between sugar and solar

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 7:30pm

As solar farms spread across the central agricultural regions of the sunshine state, opponents are becoming increasingly vocal

Colin Ash has spent a working lifetime in the cane fields near the Pioneer River in central Queensland, out past Marian, where the mill has processed sugar for more than 130 years.

“You can’t get sentimental about things,” he says from the front seat of his truck as he drives slowly around the boundary of his property. “You’ve got to pay your bills.”

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Whale dies from eating more than 80 plastic bags

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 6:44pm

Pilot whale was found barely alive in Thai canal and vomited up five bags during fruitless rescue attempts

A whale has died in southern Thailand after swallowing more than 80 plastic bags, with rescuers failing to nurse the mammal back to health.

The small male pilot whale was found barely alive in a canal near the border with Malaysia, the country’s department of marine and coastal resources said.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Bairnsdale's bat battle – photo essay

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 6:07pm

A 10-year fight between a group of residents and the East Gippsland shire council over grey-headed flying foxes is heating up again

The Australian town of Bairnsdale in Victoria – 300km east of Melbourne – is known as the gateway to east Gippsland’s natural wonders. It is also the scene of a 10-year battle between a group of residents and the East Gippsland shire council over a colony of grey-headed flying foxes that roost along the town’s Mitchell River.

In 2014, the council received federal government approval to clear critical habitat in a three-stage process, the first occurring in 2015. The debate is now heating up in the approach of stage-two clearing, which the council intends to complete by the end of 2018.

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

babysitting

The Field Lab - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 3:28pm
A few more days before the lost donkey goes to his new home.   He is still welcome here, for now.  I need a video for my monday matinee.
  95,110,68,0,B
Categories: Sustainable SW Blogs

Rebuilding Puerto Rico, As Hurricane Season Returns

NPR News - Environment - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 2:43pm

To answer the question of whether Puerto Rico is prepared for this year's hurricane season, you have to understand how far the island has come since Hurricane Maria.

Categories: Environment

Up in smoke: what did taxpayers get for their $2bn emissions fund?

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 1:00pm

Before the latest auction figures, Adam Morton investigates the plan Turnbull once called ‘a recipe for fiscal recklessness’

At some point in June, the Australian government will announce it has spent up to $2.3bn over three years on a scheme that the prime minister believes is a reckless waste of public money.

Related: Land-clearing wipes out $1bn taxpayer-funded emissions gains

Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Flooding And Rising Seas Threaten America's Oldest Farmland

NPR News - Environment - Sat, 2018/06/02 - 3:35am

Some of the oldest farmland in America is on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. But as sea levels rise, saltwater is killing crops and threatening a way of life.

(Image credit: Jennifer Ludden/NPR)

Categories: Environment
Syndicate content