Food

Food & Drink

Like Farmers, Only Younger

Quivira Coalition New Agrarians Conference

When is the last time you met a farmer? Did you happen to notice how old that farmer was? It's an unfortunate fact that in the United States farmers are generally an old and aging group. Given that without farmers we wouldn't have food it is important that more young folks start working in agriculture. The Quivira Coalition has dedicated their 10th annual conference to these new agrarians. If you would like to meet a young farmer, here is a great opportunity.

What: The Quivira Coalition's 10th Anniversary Conference - New Agrarians

Looks Terrible, Tastes Great

Gumbo z'Herbes with Rice

There has been so much great produce that I’ve been cooking up a storm. For example, this looks terrible, tastes great Gumbo z’Herbes. It is apparently a spring tradition to serve this type of gumbo that goes nuts with the greens. It just so happened that half of the refrigerator was occupied by bags of greens: kale, spinach, mixed cooking greens. This recipe took care of them all and more: the Andouille hiding in the freezer, small bundles of scallions and parsley, that cup or so of vegetable broth, and the last few squares of blue cornbread on the side.

From Grey Water to Green Plants

Grey Water Drain Pipe with Cleanout

Have you heard of La Niña? Despite the name, La Niña isn't a person 'she's' a thing - specifically a weather pattern. The important thing to know about La Niña is she tends to bring dry winters to the Southwestern US and that means drought. In my efforts to use water more efficiently I've added a grey-water system from our washing machine to irrigate a planting bed.

Secret Agent Man

Santa Fe County Extension Agent touring Bob's garden

Somewhere in your county, a secret agent stands at the ready. He (or she) is the local County Extension Agent, ready to answer your home garden and landscape questions. County Extension Agents aren't supposed to be a secret but they are lower profile than the 'Double-O' kind of agent. I just met the local Extension Agent and learned quite a lot about the art of growing plants and animals in my county.

Plant a Garden, Harvest a Community

Plant in Hands sketch

What: Santa Fe Community Garden Tour
When: Saturday, September 17, 2011 from 1-4pm
Where: 7 Gardens across Santa Fe, NM
Price: FREE!

Why I Garden #20

Narrow-Winged Damselfly

Not all the color in our garden is from flowers and leaves. We have an ever-changing circus of insects crawling and flying through our yard. One colorful visitor that I have been watching for several weeks is a Narrow-winged Damselfly with a flashy blue thorax and tail. I'm not sure exactly which species it is, though it looks like an Arroyo Bluet to me.

Ballet in the Pasture & Building Local Food Systems

Joel Salatin and Hen

Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms and Tom Delehanty of Pollo Real Ranch discuss local food systems at two public events presented by the Carbon Economy Series.

What: Building Local Food Systems - Talk & Panel Discussion with Joel Salatin and Tom Delehanty
When: Friday, August 26, 7-9pm
Where: NM School for the Deaf, James A. Little Theatre, 1060 Cerrillos Rd., Santa Fe, NM
Tickets: $10 at CarbonEconomySeries.com

Embrace the Sweat

Riding in the heat of summer sometimes means 'embracing the sweat'. But, there are ways to reduce your exposure to record-breaking heat. Cycling early or later in the day, stay well hydrated, and slowing your pace will help you keep cooler. Wear well-ventilated, wicking clothes in light colors, and bring a change of clothes when bike commuting. Acclimatizing to heat will also help your comfort and performance as you bike through the summer.

A Royal Mess

Pitting Cherries

I made a royal mess for Father’s Day. For EcoDaddyo’s first Father’s Day, we made a cherry pie. I would love to claim all the credit for its deliciousness but pitting 2-3 pounds of cherries was a messy two person job.

Why I Garden #19

Raspberry - Rubus idaeus

We've had an interesting summer so far. With the hot and dry weather some plants have suffered while others have thrived. I've focused so much attention on the plants that needed help I almost forgot to mention the Raspberries. Two years ago we planted raspberry canes from a friend's grandmother's garden. The first year's crop was small as the canes were still establishing. This year we've had a steady stream of raspberries to eat on cereal, with dessert or fresh picked. The fresh raspberry season appears to be coming to an end, so here are my thanks for the last raspberry.

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