Environment

Why we need to keep fossil fuels in the ground - video

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2015/03/16 - 5:03am
We need to reduce emissions to keep our planet safe for future generations - the science is clear. However, it can be quite hard to get your head around how to do that. Here's a very simple idea from writer and climate campaigner, Bill McKibben: keep fossil fuels in the ground. If we were to burn all the fossil fuel reserves we currently know about, experts forecast the Earth's temperature would warm by more than 2C and have catastrophic effects. Guardian journalists explain the 'keep it in the ground' theory in easy to understand terms

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Categories: Environment

World cannot prosper without cutting carbon emissions, says Climate Group

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2015/03/16 - 4:32am

Countries should consider their climate change pledges to the UN as investment prospectuses to attract low carbon businesses, argues non-profit organisation

The world cannot prosper without cutting emissions, an economic expert has warned as he urged countries to use plans for tackling climate change to attract investment.

Over the next few months countries are submitting their “intended nationally determined contributions” (INDC) outlining action they plan to take on climate change, ahead of UN talks in Paris at the end of the year to secure a new global deal on the issue.

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Categories: Environment

Pangolins: the world's most illegally traded mammal – in pictures

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2015/03/16 - 4:09am

The endangered pangolin is being eaten out of existence before many people have even heard of it. Photographer Paul Hilton followed poachers in Indonesia to raise awareness of this gentle animal’s plight

Audio slideshow: See more of Paul Hilton’s work on the impact of deforestation on Indonesia’s wildlife

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Categories: Environment

Cyclone Pam: 24 confirmed dead as Vanuatu president blames climate change

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2015/03/16 - 1:19am

Baldwin Lonsdale describes category five cyclone Pam as ‘a monster that has hit Vanuatu’, while authorities warn that the death toll could rise further

At least 24 people died when cyclone Pam hit Vanuatu at the weekend, authorities have confirmed. The storm flattened buildings, wrecked infrastructure and has left more than 3,000 people in the South Pacific island nation displaced.

As the full scale of the storm remained unclear due to the archipelago’s remote nature and its severely damaged telephone network, a statement from the national disaster management office raised the death toll from single digits and said that 3,300 people were sheltering at 37 evacuation centres.

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Categories: Environment

Wren, robin or red kite: which should be Britain’s national bird?

Guardian Environment News - Mon, 2015/03/16 - 1:00am
The UK is unusual in not having an official national bird, but that will all change on 7 May, when a national poll closes (no, not that one). There are 10 birds on the shortlist – who gets your vote? Continue reading...
Categories: Environment

Don't feed the ducks bread, say conservationists

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2015/03/15 - 11:01pm

We feed six million loaves of bread a year to ducks in England and Wales causing damage to birds’ health and polluting waterways. Oats, corn and peas are safer for the birds

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Categories: Environment

Climate change: UN backs fossil fuel divestment campaign

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2015/03/15 - 3:01am

Framework convention on climate change says it shares aim for strong deal on fighting global warming at Paris summit

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Categories: Environment

The film that reveals how American ‘experts’ discredit climate scientists

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2015/03/14 - 5:05pm
Last week the US secretary of state launched a savage attack on climate sceptics, fuelling a toxic political debate

For Naomi Oreskes, professor of scientific history at Harvard, there’s no more vivid illustration of the bitter war between science and politics than Florida’s ban on state employees using terms such as “climate change” and “global warming”. No matter that the low-lying state is critically vulnerable to rises in sea level, or that 97% of peer-reviewed climate studies confirm that climate change is occurring and human activity is responsible, the state’s Republican governor, Rick Scott, instructed state employees not to discuss it as it is not “a true fact”.

In one sense, news of the Florida directive could not have come at a better time – a hard-hitting documentary adaptation of Oreskes’s 2010 book Merchants of Doubt is just hitting US cinemas. In another sense, she says, it is profoundly depressing: the tactics now being used to prevent action over global warming are the same as those used in the past – often to great effect – to obfuscate and stall debates over evolutionary biology, ozone depletion, the dangers of asbestos or tobacco, even dangerous misconceptions about childhood vaccinations and autism.

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Categories: Environment

Colombians start ‘Big Mobilisation’ to save the country’s principal river

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2015/03/14 - 2:49pm

Protesters gather to oppose potentially devastating hydroelectric dam and waterway plans for the River Magdalena

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Categories: Environment

Ooze, Fog And Climate Change Threaten Mummies

NPR News - Environment - Sat, 2015/03/14 - 4:35am

The oldest mummies in the world are in northern Chile. Preserved for seven thousand years, the mummies are now deteriorating, and scientists say climate changes are to blame.

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Categories: Environment

Guardian Editor Pledges To Bolster Coverage Of Climate Change

NPR News - Environment - Sat, 2015/03/14 - 4:35am

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Alan Rusbridger, editor of The Guardian, about his recent column detailing his personal motivation for intensifying the paper's focus on climate change coverage.

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Categories: Environment

Why are organic farmers across Britain giving up?

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2015/03/14 - 1:30am

Consumers still eat it up — but more and more farmers are deserting organic, complaining that it costs a fortune and rowing with the Soil Association. Susanna Rustin put on her wellies to find out why they’re down on the farm

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Categories: Environment

Norway's giant fund increases stake in oil and gas companies to £20bn

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 10:52am

Divestment campaigners disappointed as world’s richest sovereign fund had earlier dumped coal companies

The world’s richest sovereign wealth fund increased its stake in major oil and gas companies to £20bn in 2014, disappointing campaigners who argue it should continue to sell off its investments in the fossil fuels that drive climate change.

Norway’s Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG), which rose to £531bn in total, revealed in February that it had shed 32 coal mining companies due to concerns that action on global warming would cut their value.

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Categories: Environment

The week in wildlife – in pictures

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 7:50am

Battle of the eagles, courting storks and golden monkeys are among the pick of this week’s images from the natural world

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Categories: Environment

Global emissions stall in 2014 following slowdown in China's economy

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 7:20am

Carbon dioxide emissions stayed the same last year compared to 2013, data shows, but falling oil prices may cause them to rise again

A slowdown in China’s economic growth helped the world to a pause in the upward rise in greenhouse gas emissions last year, according to data released on Friday.

China burnt less coal last year than expected, as the projected rise in its energy demand faltered along with the rise in its economic growth, and as the expansion of its renewable energy generation continued.

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Categories: Environment

Rembrandt's monkey: good news for Africa's newest primate

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 3:15am

Camera traps in the Democratic Republic of Congo reveal that Africa’s lesula monkey is ‘one of the few good news stories in primatology’

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Categories: Environment

US and Chinese companies dominate list of most-polluting coal plants

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 2:03am

Warren Buffet-owned Berkshire Hathaway on list of top 25 companies with least efficient and oldest ‘sub-critical’ coal power plants

The 100 global power companies most at risk from growing pressure to shut highly polluting coal plants have been revealed in a new report from Oxford University.

Chinese companies dominate the top of the ranking but US companies, including Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway, occupy 10 of the top 25 places.

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Categories: Environment

Ukip claims EU carbon cutting plans are a madness that will stop crops growing

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 1:54am

Scientists dismiss fears from Ukip MEP Stuart Agnew who claimed decarbonisation plans would affect agriculture industry, reports RTCC

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Categories: Environment

Australia bans hunting 'trophies' from lions entering or leaving the country

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2015/03/13 - 1:11am

Lion body parts used as trophies from hunting will no longer be allowed to be imported or exported, environment minister Greg Hunt says

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Categories: Environment

UK could double its fish catch if quotas allowed stocks to recover, says study

Guardian Environment News - Thu, 2015/03/12 - 11:01pm

Following scientific advice on rebuilding overfished species would double British catches within a decade creating thousands more jobs, study suggests

Fishermen in the UK could benefit from doubled fish catches within a decade and an expanded industry, if European Union fishing quotas were in line with scientific advice, a new study has found.

British fleets would be able to land 1.1bn tonnes of fish a year – up from about 560m at present – within a decade if scientific advice on re-stocking overfished species were heeded, according to estimates from the New Economics Foundation.

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Categories: Environment
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